Service Hotline
+86-755-86524100
Knowledge
Home > Knowledge > Content

Product Categories

Observation of the phase transition of liquid crystal defects for the first time

Blaze Display Technology Co., Ltd. | Updated: Jul 04, 2017

【R&D Department of Blaze Display】Researchers observed the phase transition of topological defects formed by liquid crystal (LC) materials for the first time. The phase transition of topological defects can be difficult to understand for a layperson but it needs to be studied to understand the mysteries of the universe or the underlying physics of skyrmions, which have intrinsic topological defects.

The phase transition of topological defects, which was also the theme of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2016, can be difficult to understand for a layperson but it needs to be studied to understand the mysteries of the universe or the underlying physics of skyrmions, which have intrinsic topological defects.

If the galaxy is taken as an example in the universe, it is difficult to observe the topological defects because the system is too large to observe some changes over a limited period of time. In the case of defect structures formed by LC molecules, they are not only a suitable size to observe with an optical microscope, but also the time period in which the phase transition of a defect occurring can be directly observed over a few seconds, which can be extended to a few minutes. The defect structures formed by LC material have radial, circular, or spiral shapes centering on a singularity (defect core), like the singularity that was already introduced in the famous movie "Interstellar," which is the center point of black hole.

In general, LC materials are mainly used in liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and optical sensors because it is easy to control their specific orientation and they have fast response characteristics and huge anisotropic optical properties. It is advantageous in terms of the performance of LCDs that the defects of the LC materials are minimized. The research team led by Professor Dong Ki Yoon in the Graduate School of Nanoscience and Technology did not simply minimize such defects but actively tried to use the LC defects as building blocks to make micro- and nanostructures for the patterning applications. During these efforts, they found the way to directly study the phase transition of topological defects under in-situ conditions.

 

 


Feedback
Send
Contact Us
Address: 5th Floor, HSAE Tech Building, Hi-Tech Park, Nanshan, Shenzhen, 518057, China
Tel: +86-755-86524100
Fax: +86-755-86524101
E-mail: info@blazedisplay.com
E-mail: info@blazedisplay.com Copyright © 2008 - 2018 Blaze Display Technology Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved